1. johndarnielle:

ancientpeoples:

Limestone ostracon with image of a hippopotamus 
The details in the image are remarkable. It is 10.8cm high and 12cm wide. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, 1479 - 1425 BC. 
Found in Thebes, Upper Egypt, Deir el -Bahri, 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

pretty into this hippo to be perfectly honest with you

dope hippo

    johndarnielle:

    ancientpeoples:

    Limestone ostracon with image of a hippopotamus 

    The details in the image are remarkable. It is 10.8cm high and 12cm wide. 

    Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, 1479 - 1425 BC. 

    Found in Thebes, Upper Egypt, Deir el -Bahri, 

    Source: Metropolitan Museum 

    pretty into this hippo to be perfectly honest with you

    dope hippo

  2. Gentefication at 24th & Bryant

    (Source: putthison)

  3. "…irony tyrannizes us. The reason why our pervasive cultural irony is at once so powerful and so unsatisfying is that an ironist is impossible to pin down. All U.S. irony is based on an implicit “I don’t really mean what I’m saying.” So what does irony as a cultural norm mean to say? That it’s impossible to mean what you say? That maybe it’s too bad it’s impossible, but wake up and smell the coffee already? Most likely, I think, today’s irony ends up saying: “How totally banal of you to ask what I really mean.” Anyone with the heretical gall to ask an ironist what he actually stands for ends up looking like an hysteric or a prig. And herein lies the oppressiveness of institutionalized irony, the too-successful rebel: the ability to interdict the question without attending to its subject is, when exercised, tyranny. It is the new junta, using the very tool that exposed its enemy to insulate itself."
    David Foster Wallace (via ivorytowerstyle)
  4. Ishamel Butler created Digable Planets. Now he’s pushing the hip-hop envelope again with his acclaimed group Shabazz Palaces. He talked about both with me on Bullseye.
  5. My favorite shot of Orson Welles from Touch of Evil. A stuck bull if ever there was one.

    My favorite shot of Orson Welles from Touch of Evil. A stuck bull if ever there was one.

  6. It’s coming. October 21st, 2014.
  7. jordanmorris:

    koyamapress:

    THROWBACKLIST THURSDAYS
    Highlighting titles from the Koyama Press backlist

    TURTIE NEEDS WORK BY STEVE WOLFHARD

    Do you have any work for Turtie? Because boy does he need it! As seen in this super-cute minicomic that chronicles the misadventures of our hapless half-shelled hero.

    » Buy Turtie Needs Work

    Turtie is the best!

    Yeah, Turtie totally is the best. Keep it up, Steve Wolfhard.

  8. The Jacksons - Victory Tour in Toronto

  9. Jay-Z - Early This Morning

    Jay was great. Effortlessly great.

  10. Lil B now and forever.

    diorpaint:

    Lil B - No Black Person Is Ugly *MUSIC VIDEO* MOST POWERFUL SONG OF DECADE? 

    (via tumblinerb)

  11. Ishmael Butler aka Butterfly in the studio, working on Blowout Comb.

    Ishmael Butler aka Butterfly in the studio, working on Blowout Comb.

  12. audiellen:

    I was listening to a new-ish episode of Bullseye — a podcast I’ve been following for years; it used to be The Sound of Young America — and as soon as Jesse started this Outshot, I was hoping it would be this song. I, too, have had this humble tiny song stuck in my head for years since he first included it in a broadcast.

    I want to sing it to my baby whenever I have one, I want to memorize the lyrics and sing them to myself in the car with the windows rolled down while sitting at a red light next to a car full of football players, and I want everyone to know this song exists.

    Jesse’s explanation of how the song stuck to his brain so accurately describes my feelings towards this song it’s actually pretty bizarre. This neat little song, even if only in a little teeny way, changed my life and I hope it does the same to you. Enjoy.

  13. Note to Pharrell: next time you shoot a video in my office building, let me know. We can hang and talk about “Ambulance” by Fam-lay.

  14. Photo by Noe Montes on our way back from lunch. A fun game is to check my ridiculous suit for kimchi stains.

    Photo by Noe Montes on our way back from lunch. A fun game is to check my ridiculous suit for kimchi stains.

  15. Stop Whining About Zach Braff

    I will start with this: I don’t know Zach Braff, and I have no idea if he’s a nice guy or a heel. I saw Garden State and wasn’t nuts about it, and I’m not a huge Scrubs fan. I’m also jealous of his New York apartment which I once saw in maybe the New York Times? It was beautiful. So basically overall I’m the kind of guy who is complaining a lot about Zach Braff right now.

    But seriously, people like me: quit complaining about Zach Braff. Especially his Kickstarter. You’re being dicks.

    As someone who does a lot of work that’s supported by its consumers, I have strong feelings about this. And frankly, those feelings are pro-Braff.

    Here is the transaction that Zach Braff offered fans of his work in the Kickstarter for Wish I Was Here: you put up some money, I will make a movie you want to see. Why is that bad?

    He didn’t even ask people to put up all the money. He managed to secure financing for a significant portion of the budget, and a loan to keep things moving, but needed a final piece. Which his fans were happy to provide him. Because they wanted to see the movie.

    In fact, his fans so wanted to see it, that they kept giving to the project even after the goal was met, to the tune of over a million bucks. Because they wanted to directly support a guy whose work they loved.

    Look - I don’t love his work. Maybe you don’t either. But why shouldn’t people who like something pay to get it made? What the hell’s wrong with that?

    Here are some complaints I’ve heard:

    But he’s a Hollywood insider! Couldn’t he just get the money himself?

    I don’t think people understand how hard it is to make any showbusiness project happen. The truth is that he tried, and he couldn’t. The best he could do was a version where he (the director) gave up final cut, and he didn’t want to give up final cut on a project that was very personal to him. So he wondered if people who wanted to see his version would want to pay for it. And they did.

    Isn’t he a millionaire?

    Sure. I mean, I saw his apartment in that magazine, that’s gotta be worth a million bucks easy. That doesn’t mean he can make a movie out of pocket, though, or that he should. The truth of movie-making is that most projects lose money. Only by amortizing across a lot of projects does the investment make any sense, and as you can see by the franchise-ation of moviedom, there’s so much risk in small adult dramas that people with real money don’t even bother with them any more. Why should he risk losing everything he has? Why is that expected of him?

    Kickstarter’s for the little guy!

    Well, for one thing - this is the little guy. Five million bucks for a feature film with lots of semi-famous people and a full crew and shooting schedule and several significant effects sequences is the little guy. Not the littlest guy, but the little guy. Movies are expensive. Trust me.

    For another thing… why? Why shouldn’t a medium-sized guy use this method to raise money for a creative project? This isn’t a charitable endeavor. People are paying for something they want to see in the world.

    He’s manipulating his fans!

    His fans are grown ups. They can decide for themselves whether getting a movie made and seeing it in an advance screening is worth thirty bucks to them. Or if getting a movie made and seeing it in a regular movie theater is worth them kicking in ten bucks beyond the regular ticket price. Just because their tastes are different from yours doesn’t make them idiots. Which brings me to…

    But he’s so lame!

    This has nothing and everything to do with it. Are you being a dick about this because you don’t like how he raised the money, or because you didn’t like Garden State? Or because you did like Garden State and now you’re embarrassed about that because the world changed around you and/or you grew up and now you know you’re not supposed to like Garden State?

    Look…

    This movie isn’t for me. But it is for someone. 46,000 someones.

    More importantly: directly audience-funded creative work is by far a net positive for society. It fosters deeper and more important work - there’s a big difference between your relationship to something you voluntary give money to and something you’re willing to show up to a theater with friends for. It reduces the risk inherent in any creative undertaking for the creative people. It makes it so that folks can spend more of their time making and less begging big corporations for money. It gives creative people control, with the backing of people who like their work, rather than giving that control to someone who wants to sell stuff. All of these are good, good things.

    Let’s break the idea that this is a matter of charity. No one pities Zach Braff. He’s rich and handsome and doing well for himself. But tens of thousands of people love his work, and they want more of it. They’re willing to pay for it. And you don’t have to go see it. So what the heck’s wrong with that?